fbpx
Top

Previous :
Interview of the month: Pauline Philippe

Next :
Using industrialisation to accelerate the energy revolution

portrait
Sustainable construction

Tuesday January 28th, 2020

3+

Stéphanie Barrault, head of the Circular Design Experience project: applying all of the circular-economy principles to the construction sector

In France, the construction sector generates more than 40 million tonnes of waste every year and consumes large quantities of resources to meet the needs of renovation and new construction. A situation that contributes to threatening certain resources with scarcity, or even shortage, in the medium to long term. For example, this is the case with sand, of which the sector is a large consumer.

Next :
What’s the situation with “Mobility As A Service”?

3+

0 Comment
Your comment has been sent, thank you! It will appear after validation by the webmaster.

Comment
    Comment? opinion? suggestion?

    You will also like...

    • The Olympic Games: a powerful lever for regional development

      The Olympic and Paralympic Games represent a wonderful opportunity to rethink the regions through ambitious urban projects. This event associated with the Greater Paris area will enable the capital to perfect its status as a global city and accelerate the transformation of the Ile-de-France department. Spotlight on the impact of the Olympic Games on our cities and on the economic benefits derived from the magic of Olympism.

    • Reinventing collective housing, and more

      The need to make cities denser and to develop original tools for collaboration is giving rise to new ways of approaching the design of urban planning and housing. There are two objectives: to get citizens involved in urban projects that affect them directly; and, in parallel, to promote the design of open and custom collective housing in their own image.

    • How can we develop and build in the context of “Zero net artificialisation” ?

      23,000 hectares: this is the average annual area of natural, agricultural or forest land reallocated to urbanisation in France over recent years, the equivalent of 2.2 times the area of Paris, 33,000 football pitches or 19 million parking spaces. A figure which makes France one of the worst European students with regard to restraining real-estate development. The impact on biodiversity and CO2 emissions are such that there is an urgent need to hold back this effect. Although the target of Zero net artificialisation (ZAN) was written into the national biodiversity plan in July 2018, the strategy, method and means of bringing this into reality remains to be specified. Likewise the search for a denser, viable and liveable urban development model in large conurbations as well as town centres and small and medium-sized towns.

    • Reuse – the fourth pillar of the circular economy

      The idea of reusing materials resulting from renovation or demolition work is gaining momentum. It has to be said that it is very attractive since by reviving this age-old practice, there is indeed much to be gained - new means of recycling, low-cost materials, improved carbon footprint during activities, etc... The list is long. All that remains is to remove any barriers.

    • Solar farm in Japan: a first!

      Equis Energy, Asia‐Pacific’s largest renewable energy Independent Power Producer, has selected Bouygues Energies & Services and Toho Electrical (Toho) to build a 13.7 MW solar project in Noheji, in the north of Japan. A first step for the Group in the country!

    • Using industrialisation to accelerate the energy revolution

      One of the most significant potential areas for saving energy and greenhouse gases is the thermal renovation of buildings. But we are not renovating enough. The method needs to change, and this will probably happen via industrialisation. Industrialisation, boosted by the European EnergieSprong project, means improved performance and quality of use.