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Building

It is really important to the Bouygues Construction group to constantly set themselves new architectural and technical challenges. Constructing a building is above all looking at the finished result. A hospital clearly isn’t designed in the same way as a hotel. Whether it be urban housing, industrial sites, renovating an entire district or constructing a tower, Bouygues Construction can rely on the best technology and the creativity of its teams. Some of the intricate projects where Bouygues Construction has implemented its leading expertise in Building and Civil Works include: musical complexes, stadiums, shopping centres and airports. This is due to public-private partnerships in particular.

Let’s imagine tomorrow’s buildings together

The collective foresight approach “Let’s imagine tomorrow’s buildings together”, initiated by the Scientific and Technical Centre for Building (CSTB) and the French environment and energy conservation agency (ADEME), aims to prepare for the future of buildings in France by 2050 by sharing the different visions of construction and real estate players. Bouygues Construction is one of the partners in this open and collaborative approach that aims to plan ahead for the future of our buildings.

Dismantlability, for a circular economy in construction

Applying the principles of the circular economy to the city, circular urbanism advocates a change of approach to build the city on itself and make better use of existing assets and resources in the process of urban design. This is a matter of urgency in the context of climate change, resource scarcity and the critical fragility of the ecosystems from which the materials are taken. According to Sylvain Grisot, author of a manifesto on the subject, recycling spaces, transforming the existing while avoiding deconstruction, and intensifying the uses of spaces are the three golden rules to adopt in order to radically change our methods. Among the many possible tools, let’s explore the dismantlability of buildings: what is a dismantlable building, how should it be designed and for what purpose?

Intensifying the use of existing buildings

How do we do more with less? Modern cities are faced with numerous challenges. They need to emit less carbon and halt urban spread into natural areas, while also having enough space to live in social harmony and in line with shifting trends (reconstituted families, telework, etc.). With these contradictory demands—acquiring more space with less sprawl—time becomes an unexpected resource. Some spaces in our buildings are used only for certain times of the day, week or year. For example, educational facilities are generally used around 20% of the time, while offices are used between 30% and 45% of the time. This means they can be used more, by finding new users and new ways to use them. Let’s look at a few concrete examples.

Care homes & hospitals: digitisation for useful, comfortable, sustainable construction

To meet the needs of both patients and healthcare workers, each healthcare site must combine reliability with ease of use. This fact is not always taken into account. This is evidenced by the numerous problems pointed out by users relating to space and practical issues. However, whether in care homes or hospitals, the building can be a valuable asset in taking care of the most vulnerable and allowing health professionals to work in the best possible conditions. This is a major challenge that Bouygues Construction wants to address using digitisation.

Openness and sharing: sources of value for the world to come…

How to be attractive, create value and be scalable is the challenge for office buildings in order to meet all the complexity of an increasingly pressurised market. The uses and structure of such buildings require urgent rethinking in order to meet the new expectations of their occupants, as well as health and environmental issues. Solutions exist, but such changes must be anticipated in order to be implemented effectively.

The future of 3D printing in construction – interview with Bruno Linéatte, Director of R&D for Building Construction Methods at Bouygues Construction

Bouygues Immobilier Grand Ouest gained prominence recently for using 3D printing to build "La Sphère", a reception building for a public housing project in Harfleur on behalf of Immobilière Basse Seine - 3F Group. What challenges await this innovative mode of construction? Read on for answers from Bruno Linéatte, Director of R&D for Building Construction Methods at Bouygues Construction.

Self-healing concrete

Several research centres around the world are working on proactive self-healing concrete processes, anticipating cracks as early as the design or the placing of the concrete.

The tertiary decree: 60% energy savings are in sight

The so-called ‘tertiary’ decree, applicable since 2019, imposes a gradual reduction in the energy consumption of this type of building up until 2050. Like any new regulation, this involves a period of adaptation - especially as the objectives set are ambitious. However, the ‘Syndicat professionnel des entreprises de la transition énergétique et numérique’ (Serce) (Professional Union of Energy and Digital Transition Companies)considers them to befully attainable.

Energy renovation – the driving force behind new uses

While improving energy performance is essential during a renovation project, it is not the sole objective of project managers. Of equal importance are the key features aimed at incorporating different uses within a building. Issues such as planning, digitalisation, occupation of space, quality of life at work, etc. also need to be fully addressed.

Stéphanie Barrault, head of the Circular Design Experience project: applying all of the circular-economy principles to the construction sector

In France, the construction sector generates more than 40 million tonnes of waste every year and consumes large quantities of resources to meet the needs of renovation and new construction. A situation that contributes to threatening certain resources with scarcity, or even shortage, in the medium to long term. For example, this is the case with sand, of which the sector is a large consumer.

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