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Building

It is really important to the Bouygues Construction group to constantly set themselves new architectural and technical challenges. Constructing a building is above all looking at the finished result. A hospital clearly isn’t designed in the same way as a hotel. Whether it be urban housing, industrial sites, renovating an entire district or constructing a tower, Bouygues Construction can rely on the best technology and the creativity of its teams. Some of the intricate projects where Bouygues Construction has implemented its leading expertise in Building and Civil Works include: musical complexes, stadiums, shopping centres and airports. This is due to public-private partnerships in particular.

Stéphanie Barrault, head of the Circular Design Experience project: applying all of the circular-economy principles to the construction sector

In France, the construction sector generates more than 40 million tonnes of waste every year and consumes large quantities of resources to meet the needs of renovation and new construction. A situation that contributes to threatening certain resources with scarcity, or even shortage, in the medium to long term. For example, this is the case with sand, of which the sector is a large consumer.

Three questions to… Mehdi Hafsia

Mehdi Hafsia, research engineer for the R&D division, attended the 19th International Conference for Construction Applications of Virtual Reality (CONVR19), an international event dedicated to new technologies in our sector. He would like to share his feedback with us.

Reinventing collective housing, and more

The need to make cities denser and to develop original tools for collaboration is giving rise to new ways of approaching the design of urban planning and housing. There are two objectives: to get citizens involved in urban projects that affect them directly; and, in parallel, to promote the design of open and custom collective housing in their own image.

Still engaged with change after ninety years

Although the HLM movement will soon be a hundred years old, it is still calmly and determinedly addressing the challenges it must face: providing homes, of course, but also accommodating changes in society. Energy transition, climate change, regional sustainability, and the shift to digitalisation are all taken into account.

Cities to be: “From aspirational metropolis to inspirational city”

Providing levers for attaining the goals of sustainable development, such is the ambition of Cities to Be. In concrete terms, this means pooling experiences, solutions and best practices, generating momentum among the territories, and persuading players of the building sector to commit to such goals. All in the aim of creating a denser, more resilient city that offers, quite simply, a pleasant way of life.

Temporary urbanism is transforming cities

Creating new spaces and experimental urban projects – whether they’re cultural, social or economic – revitalising spaces before their conversion for future use, making use of empty buildings, creating a dynamic in which members of the community can get involved, encouraging them to take part and to contribute to the creation of an area’s identity etc. A look at temporary urbanism-–building cities differently so that they can adapt to fit the changing needs of their inhabitants.

Greener construction – just a fad or a genuine concern?

Across the world, nearly 200 m3 of concrete is poured every second. Concrete is one of the most widely used industrial products - even more so than oil. Although we know all about its advantages in terms of land development, its drawbacks are significant. It is one of the major sources of CO2 emissions due to its cement content. About one billion tonnes of CO2 is released each year in the world by the cement industry. In the face of such global challenges and future changes in urbanisation, a revolution in construction methods is beginning. How can the construction sector commit to becoming more carbon-free?

Be Issy: a convenient window onto the city

Whether reimagining the tripod shape to move proudly towards the traditional shape of the closed island, stepping back from the street , using curves to provide a maximum of natural light or working with materials to create pleasant, social spaces, the research and design work done here at Be Issy by the architects from PCA Stream is intended to improve the lives of the occupants.

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