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Sustainable solutions for the cities of the future – Pollutec 2016

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COP22: inventing the world of tomorrow!

Sustainable construction

Tuesday December 6th, 2016

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Clearing and recovering spoil on our construction sites

Rising to the environmental challenge posed by construction-site spoil, we have sought to offer a reliable, safe solution for optimising resources.

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A training day to improve safety on construction sites

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