fbpx
Top

Previous :
Building the Australian infrastructure of tomorrow

Next :
The Olympic Games: a powerful lever for regional development

centrale éolienne flottante
Sustainable construction

Tuesday December 11th, 2018

4+

Are floating solar panels the future of the industry ?

In Piolenc, in the French department of Vaucluse, 47,000 photovoltaic panels will soon cover 17 hectares… of water!

Next :
Bouygues Construction goes down the path of artificial intelligence

4+

0 Comment
Your comment has been sent, thank you! It will appear after validation by the webmaster.

Comment
    Comment? opinion? suggestion?

    You will also like...

    • The AccorHotels Arena as seen by its users

      The new Bercy, renamed AccorHotels Arena at the end of 2015, has completely changed after renovations by Bouygues Bâtiment Ile-de-France – Ouvrages Publics and Bouygues Energies & Services. Find out how we redefined this landmark building to better live together. The AccorHotels Arena has been open to the public for over six months, following its inauguration […]

    • Greener construction – just a fad or a genuine concern?

      Across the world, nearly 200 m3 of concrete is poured every second. Concrete is one of the most widely used industrial products - even more so than oil. Although we know all about its advantages in terms of land development, its drawbacks are significant. It is one of the major sources of CO2 emissions due to its cement content. About one billion tonnes of CO2 is released each year in the world by the cement industry. In the face of such global challenges and future changes in urbanisation, a revolution in construction methods is beginning. How can the construction sector commit to becoming more carbon-free?

    • Still engaged with change after ninety years

      Although the HLM movement will soon be a hundred years old, it is still calmly and determinedly addressing the challenges it must face: providing homes, of course, but also accommodating changes in society. Energy transition, climate change, regional sustainability, and the shift to digitalisation are all taken into account.

    • Towns and buildings desperately seeking biodiversity

      UN experts have issued a chilling verdict: in cities and in the countryside, biodiversity is at death's door. The good news, as with climate change, is that it is not too late. Although natural areas remain the priority, urban planners and developers in the broad sense must learn to build, to rebuild cities and buildings that will let ecosystems flourish, where ecological continuity really comes into its own.

    • Using industrialisation to accelerate the energy revolution

      One of the most significant potential areas for saving energy and greenhouse gases is the thermal renovation of buildings. But we are not renovating enough. The method needs to change, and this will probably happen via industrialisation. Industrialisation, boosted by the European EnergieSprong project, means improved performance and quality of use.