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Quartier Circulaire 2 Rives
Sustainable construction

Thursday October 31st, 2019

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2 Rives, the circular-economy neighbourhood in Paris

When companies start pooling their efforts, sharing their tools and valuing their resources, does that create a circular economy?

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When 3D printing meets plastic recycling …

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