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Sustainable construction

Wednesday November 7th, 2018

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Will electrical cars be mandatory by the year 2030?

Are European car manufacturers poised to switch to all-electric? On 10 September, MEPs in Brussels gave their support for draft legislation setting a 45% reduction in CO2 emissions from cars and vans under 3.5 tonnes by the year 2030, with an intermediate target of 20% by 2025. A much more ambitious roadmap than that of the European Commission, which tabled plans for a 30% reduction by 2030.

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Renovation of the Carnavalet museum – History of Paris: one of the greatest cultural construction sites of Paris

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