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Impression 3D Recyclage Plastique
Forward thinking

Thursday October 31st, 2019

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When 3D printing meets plastic recycling …

Today, 300 million tons of plastic are produced each and every year worldwide, including more than 60 in Europe, where packaging accounts for the vast majority of single use plastic. Where does it go and how can it be used in 3D printing?

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Making paint synonymous with the circular economy

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