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Forward thinking

Friday September 25th, 2020

Young people and housing: Swiss Army Knife, Open Door or Ready to Use?

In our previous article on the youth’s relationship with housing, we provided you with general trends on where young people live and their perceptions of housing. These lessons, drawn from a series of surveys carried out by JAM for Bouygues Construction among 1,000 young people aged between 18 and 25, led to the development of 6 model profiles, devised with young volunteers at a workshop following the survey. Today, we present you with the first three typical profiles, which give an insight into the different visions of housing that are cohabiting in the new generation.

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Building reversible today, to better transform tomorrow

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